Intesa Sanpaolo Office Building, Torino, Italy



Architect
Renzo Piano Workshop
Date Built
2006 - 2015
Location
Corso Vittorio Emanuele II
Description
On March 3, 2006 the City of Torino and Intesa Sanpaulo issued a joint press release which announced that, "The preliminary purchase agreement has been signed by both the City of Turin and Sanpaolo IMI referred to the area with a ground surface of 50,000 sq.m. with the related building rights, located near Turin's historical centre (Spina 2 - Porta Susa) and bordered by Corso Vittorio Emanuele, Corso Inghilterra and Via Cavalli.  Sanpaolo IMI will construct its new and prestigious Headquarters in this area. ... The Headquarters will contain the Group's management structures and the corporate centre, with offices accommodating approximately 2,000 staff and operating areas to provide services to customers. The building to be constructed will extend to a height of approximately 150 metres. ... Sanpaolo IMI has launched an international design consultation to construct a building with characteristics which represent a high and significant cultural contribution in the architectural field, in terms of the Bank's image and the image of the entire city, and for which the following persons have been invited: Hiroshi Hara of Tokyo, Carlos Lamela of Madrid, Daniel Libeskind of New York, the MVRDV design studio of Rotterdam, Dominique Perrault of Paris and the Italian architect Renzo Piano."

The result of this consultation process was that Renzo Piano was commissioned to design the new building.  On June 29th of 2006 the company issued another press release entitled, "Sanpaolo IMI and Renzo Piano take Turin into the future with a new skyscraper"

The Renzo Piano Workshop website says that, "The tower is a bioclimatic building in which specific design solutions guarantee the respect of the most advanced sustainable standards. The east and west fa├žades are clad with a double skin system whose louvers open in summer and close in winter thus allowing an optimized thermal insulation. The full height of the southern facade is covered by two strips of photovoltaic panels and a vertical winter garden, whose evergreen climbers filter the daylight.  The thermal control of the building is guaranteed by the opening of air vents at night so that concrete double slabs are cooled down by the circulation of fresh air. The tower aims to be perceived as a discreet, almost ethereal architectural presence. Luminescent as a piece of ice, it will offer subtle changes in light throughout the day, while a multitude of luminous LEDs will make it shimmer at night."

The images above and below were taken in June of 2013.